New Study Reveals More Serious Problems With IVC Filters

ivc filters

IVC filters, or inferior vena cava filters, are devices that are implanted in the largest vein in the body to prevent potentially fatal blood clots from reaching the heart or lungs. Though the cage-like devices were initially designed to be lifesavers, they have turned out to present tremendous dangers to patients as they have both broken and migrated to other parts of the body.

Thousands of lawsuits have been filed against the manufacturers of these devices, and now a new study has found additional problems: according to researchers from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, certain patients receiving IVC filters may be more likely to die within one month of the device being implanted.

According to an IVC study published in the journal JAMA Network Open, patients who either are unable to take blood thinners or who have been diagnosed with venous thromboembolic (VTE) disease have an 18 percent increase in the risk of death within 30 days of having the controversial device implanted.

According to an IVC study published in the journal JAMA Network Open, patients who either are unable to take blood thinners or who have been diagnosed with venous thromboembolic (VTE) disease have an 18 percent increase in the risk of death within 30 days of having the controversial device implanted.

Study and Accompanying Editorial Questions IVC Filter Use

Though several professional societies have consistently recommended the use of the IVC filter, another group of physicians question the wisdom of its continued use and attached an editorial to the study’ results. “We believe the greatest value of the study is to call out how limited our current evidence base is to support such a commonly used device,” the editorial’s authors wrote.

They go on to suggest that the medical community needs to demand higher quality studies from those providing them with medical devices, writing, “We believe the greatest value of the study is to call out how limited our current evidence base is to support such a commonly used device and to challenge the clinical and research communities to demand higher-quality studies before practices become ingrained.”

IVC filters have been blamed for personal injuries in thousands of lawsuits filed against their manufacturers, and juries have awarded millions of dollars to those who have been harmed by the devices.

Author: Terri Oppenheimer

Terri Oppenheimer

Terri Oppenheimer is an independent writer, editor, and proofreader. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a degree in English. She specializes in providing content for websites and finds tremendous enjoyment in the things she learns while doing her research. Her specific areas of interest include health and fitness, medical research, and the law.