Fatal Houston Car Accident Blamed on Inadequate Construction Signage

car accident

Following a 2017 Houston car accident that claimed the lives of her husband and children, Roxanne Freeman has filed a lawsuit against a major road builder, accusing them of failing to provide an appropriate warning to drivers and in their duty to safely manage traffic in a work zone. Mrs. Freeman’s 41-year-old husband Heywood and her two children, five-year-old Heywood Jr. and four-year-old Halynn were killed in the tragic crash.

Following a 2017 Houston car accident that claimed the lives of her husband and children, Roxanne Freeman has filed a lawsuit against a major road builder, accusing them of failing to provide an appropriate warning to drivers and in their duty to safely manage traffic in a work zone. Mrs. Freeman’s 41-year-old husband Heywood and her two children, five-year-old Heywood Jr. and four-year-old Halynn were killed in the tragic crash.

Houston Car Accident Blamed on Failure to Manage Construction Safety

Houston car accident investigators say that the road construction company had a contract that required that drivers be warned about the construction zone, yet despite this requirement, they failed to correctly place signs and traffic control devices. They say that Mr. Addy was driving five miles per hour slower than the normal speed limit on the beltway. Though he was traveling at a higher rate of speed than the limit for the work zone, the signs that were posted about the lowered speed limit were posted someplace where he was unable to see it. As a result, a Harris County grand jury failed to indict him, and the district attorney’s vehicular crimes division blamed the accident on “inadequate” signage.

Author: Terri Oppenheimer

Terri Oppenheimer

Terri Oppenheimer is an independent writer, editor, and proofreader. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a degree in English. She specializes in providing content for websites and finds tremendous enjoyment in the things she learns while doing her research. Her specific areas of interest include health and fitness, medical research, and the law.