Asbestos-Related Lung Cancer Case Ends With $1.8 Million Award to Family

asbestos-related lung cancer verdict

The family of a Michigan steelworker has been awarded a judgment of $1.8 million plus costs after a jury heard evidence of negligence on the part of the Ferro Engineering Division of ON Marine Services Co. LLC. The family had claimed that the company had been responsible for his exposure to asbestos-contaminated products throughout his 30-year career by selling a ready-mix cement used to pour molten steel, as well as other asbestos-containing products, to his employer, the Ford Rogue Steel Plant in Dearborn, Michigan.

It wasn’t until 15 years after James Parrot had retired from his job that he was diagnosed with lung cancer. He died at the age of 70. The jury hearing the two-week lengthy proceedings decided unanimously against the Cleveland-based company, finding it guilty of negligence and wanton misconduct. It is the first time in Michigan’s history that a jury has reached this conclusion and the largest lung cancer verdict in the state’s asbestos litigation history.

"Most asbestos cases that go to verdict, especially in Michigan, are for mesothelioma. Going to verdict in lung cancer cases is unusual. It shows exposed people are getting lung cancer in addition to mesothelioma."

Advocate for Mr. Parrot’s Family

Jury Finds Man’s Lung Cancer Was Caused by Exposure to Asbestos

In hearing the case against Ferro Marine, the jury was shown evidence that the company “had knowledge since 1965 that their products caused cancer” and had taken steps to “protect its own workers,” yet had sold “cancer-causing products to others. They never so much as put warnings on the products.” Though most people are aware that exposure to asbestos causes mesothelioma, a rare and deadly form of cancer, the carcinogenic material has also been linked to a variety of other cancers and illnesses. Said one advocate for Mr. Parrot’s family, “Most asbestos cases that go to verdict, especially in Michigan, are for mesothelioma. Going to verdict in lung cancer cases is unusual. It shows exposed people are getting lung cancer in addition to mesothelioma.”

Author: Terri Oppenheimer

Terri Oppenheimer

Terri Oppenheimer is an independent writer, editor, and proofreader. She graduated from the College of William and Mary with a degree in English. She specializes in providing content for websites and finds tremendous enjoyment in the things she learns while doing her research. Her specific areas of interest include health and fitness, medical research, and the law.